Virginia Archaeology Center Powers the Past with 5 KW Solar PV Array

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The Fairfield Foundation announces a new 5 kW solar PV array at its Center for Archaeology, Preservation and Education in Gloucester, Virginia. The nonprofit will sell excess energy generated by the installation to Dominion Virginia Power to help meet others’ energy needs.

 

The Fairfield Foundation’s Center for Archaeology, Preservation and Education (CAPE) in Gloucester, Virginia will soon be powered by the sun.

The nonprofit partnered with Dominion Virginia Power to install a 5 kW solar PV array on the roof of the regional preservation center and archaeology lab. Dominion Power funded the purchase, as well as the installation by the Richmond-based company Off-Grid by Design. The installation is the first of its kind in the area.

The solar panels on the roof of the CAPE will provide more than enough energy to operate the building. Through Dominion’s pilot Solar Purchase Program, the excess energy generated by the installation will be sold back to Dominion Virginia Power to help meet others’ energy needs.

“We’re excited to offer the Solar Purchase Program to qualifying customers across our Virginia service territory as we continue to see an increased interest in solar generation,” said Melanie Rapp Beale, Dominion Virginia Power’s Eastern Region External Affairs Manager.

“The help of these community partners allows us to set an example for sustainable design in our region, and highlight the opportunities for merging preservation with innovation,” said Fairfield Foundation’s co-director, Thane Harpole.

The CAPE will be a place where the public can learn about and participate in activities that enhance and promote the history and cultural heritage of the Middle Peninsula and beyond.

Work is being done now to bring the CAPE, formerly the Edge Hill Service Station, much closer to its 1930s appearance. When the CAPE is complete and open to the community, it will function as an archaeology lab, working classroom, museum, preservation information center, and community gathering space.

“This showcases the talents of many of our local craftsmen, and highlights some of the direct economic benefits of historic preservation on our community,” Harpole said. “The CAPE is a community project, and local citizens and businesses have stepped up to the plate to help make this vision a reality.”